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Seminar in Phoenix – Handle with Care: Responding to Whistleblower Claims

December 21, 2017


Bryan Cave lawyers Mark Srere and Jay Zweig will present a timely and informative live presentation on whistleblowing in the workplace on Wednesday, January 10, 8:00 – 9:30 a.m. (MT)

The Phoenician Resort 6000 E Camelback Rd Scottsdale, AZ 85251

Whistleblowing in the workplace raises challenging employment law and civil and criminal liability issues for employers. News media coverage of and social media campaigns on everything from sexual harassment to financial reporting, to government contracting, to environmental issues, and a host of other laws have resulted in a large number of whistleblowing claims. This program will address what employers must do to prepare for the time when an employee blows the whistle internally, or reports to law enforcement. Our presenters will discuss and answer your questions on:

  • The legal protections for whistleblowers;
  • How to effectively investigate a whistleblower complaint;
  • How employers can manage a whistleblower after a complaint so as to

Other Perspectives on Trends in Employee Noncompetition Agreements

In mid-May, the New York Times published a long article reporting a national trend that employers are expanding both the number of employees who are required to sign non-competition agreements and the types of employees required to sign these agreements.  The article emphasized stories of low-paid, low-level employees who could not find a new job, or had to take a lower paying job, because they signed a non-competition agreement.  The Times ran an editorial that urged legislatures to prohibit employers from restricting the employment opportunities of lower paid employees.

What is missing from this picture?

While the Times article mentioned states vary in enforcement of non-competition restrictions, noting that California prohibits all restrictions on employees moving to new jobs, it did not explain the important differences in how states other than California enforce non-competition restrictions.  The Times article also did not report the damage to a business that may

Arizona Mandatory Paid Sick Leave Update: Can We Use Our Old PTO System?

As Arizona employers prepare for the imminent July 1 effective date of Arizona’s first mandatory paid sick time law (The Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act (the “Act”)), one of  the questions that we get most frequently is, “If we have a Paid Time Off policy, do we need to have a separate policy for paid sick time?”

Read our recent Client Alert here: Arizona Mandatory Paid Sick Leave Update

Bryan Cave LLP has a team of knowledgeable lawyers and other professionals prepared to help employers assess their sick time obligations. If you or your organization would like more information on compliance with sick time laws, please contact an attorney in the Labor and Employment practice group.

Mandatory Paid Sick Leave for Arizona Employees: How Proposition 206 Impacts Your Business

After surviving a legal challenge rejected by the Arizona Supreme Court, Arizona’s $10 minimum wage enacted under Proposition 206 is already in effect, and the sick leave portion of the law takes effect in July. For many companies, this will require new paid time off and sick leave policies, or at least revisions to their existing policies.

With enactment of Proposition 206, Arizona joins other states with sick leave laws, including Illinois, California, Oregon, Washington, Massachusetts, Vermont, and Washington, D.C. As previously reported by the Bryan Cave Retail Law blog, the Illinois law took effect in January 2017.

The Arizona law generally applies to all Arizona employees; it makes no distinction between salaried, hourly, full-time, part-time, temporary or seasonal employees. All employees must accrue one hour of paid sick time for every 30 hours worked.

Paid sick leave can be used for medical care of a mental or physical illness,

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